Research Areas

Biomaterials

Foreign body giant cell on polymer surface

The biomaterials group focuses on the (i) development of natural and synthetic materials used to facilitate the repair of damaged or diseased tissues and organs, and (ii) materials to be used in conjunction with biomedical tools and devices. Specific examples include drug delivery devices, cell encapsulation devices, tissue engineering scaffold materials and synthetic synovial fluid. Current research topics include cell and protein delivery for therapeutic angiogenesis, cell delivery for treatment of damaged articular cartilage and intervertebral disc, cell sheet technology, ocular drug delivery systems, the development of synthetic polymer scaffolds for ligament tissue regeneration, as well as studies into fundamental cell-biomaterial interactions. This group utilizes laboratory experimentation facilities located in the Department of Chemical Engineering, the Biosciences Complex, the Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering, and the Human Mobility Research Centre at Kingston General Hospital.

Researchers:

Biomechanics and Prosthetics

Participant in motion capture experiment

The biomechanics and prosthetics group focuses on the study of: (i) whole body and limb biomechanics during daily living and before/after surgical treatment and (ii) the design and development of medical implants and prosthetics (e.g. total joint replacements, lower limb amputee devices) for the industrialized world as well as novel approaches for applications in the developing world. This group utilizes laboratory experimentation and numerical modelling research facilities located in the Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering and the Human Mobility Research Centre at Kingston General Hospital and Hotel Dieu Hospital.

Researchers:

Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

Schematic of dual growth factor delivery system

The tissue engineering/regenerative medicine group focuses on the development of new therapeutic approaches to advance healthcare based on improving or replacing the biological function of damaged or diseased tissues and organs. Research in this area is conducted on the development of (i) laboratory grown functional replacement tissues and (ii) cell encapsulation devices. Specific applications include the development articular cartilage, ligament, intervertebral disc, adipose tissue and implantable insulin producing devices. This group utilizes laboratory experimentation research facilities located in the Department of Chemical Engineering, the Biosciences Complex, and the Human Mobility Research Centre at Kingston General Hospital.

Researchers:

Biomedical and Intelligent Systems

The Biomedical and Intelligent Systems group comprises expertise in the areas of robotics, computer vision, discrete-event systems, nonlinear system identification, protein sequence classification, modelling and human performance monitoring. The research on robotic control is focused on the application of control systems in prosthetics, telerobotics, haptics and virtual environments with the integration of processed biological signals in the control structure. Research into computer vision is centred on object recognition, pose determination and 3D tracking with applications to robotics. Discrete-event systems techniques are being used in modelling emergency response to epidemiological outbreaks. Nonlinear system identification is used for protein sequence classification, for analysing gene expression, and for prognosis and diagnosis of disease. Human performance monitoring research is being conducted to assess kinetics, kinematics and energy expenditure during the performance of various tasks. This group utilizes f laboratory experimentation research facilities located in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, the Human Mobility Research Centre at Kingston General Hospital and the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies.

Researchers:

For additional details, interested students are encouraged to contact the individual faculty members listed above.

Queen’s University is situated on traditional Anishnaabe and Haudenosaunee Territory.